Review: Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic: Health Care in Early America

Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic: Health Care in Early America
Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic: Health Care in Early America by Elaine G. Breslaw
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

If you’ve ever wondered how this country’s healthcare situation got so screwed up, this slim volume reveals the roots of our deep divide over how, why, and to whom quality medical care should be provided.

American exceptionalism leading American doctors to dismiss new theories championed by European healthcare providers? Distrust by many Americans of vaccines? Poor people’s bad health being blamed on moral failings rather than on the unsafe and sometimes unsanitary environment in which they live? Religious leaders seeking absolute control over women’s reproductive health? Shocking disparity in the quality of care provided to white and nonwhite patients? It all started here, in the early days of the United States, and the decisions made in those early days still reverberate today.

I absolutely recommend this book to anyone interested in the history of medicine in the United States, and it should be required reading for every politician on any healthcare task force.

View all my reviews

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Reviews

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s